Cskills Awards Level 3 Diploma in Bench Joinery (Construction) - NEW

Qualification Code: DIP072

QRN Ref: 600/8617/8

Version DIP072/20130801/1

Published by
Cskills Awards,
Bircham Newton, King’s Lynn,
Norfolk PE31 6RH

First published 2013

© Construction Industry Training Board 2013

The Construction Industry Training Board otherwise known as CITB-ConstructionSkills and ConstructionSkills is a registered charity (Charity Number: 264289)

Cskills Awards has made every effort to ensure that the information contained within this publication is accurate at the time of going to print. However, Cskills Awards products and services are subject to continuous development and improvement and the right is reserved to change products and services from time to time.

This pack has been prepared as a downloadable resource. It may be freely printed without further permission from Cskills Awards on the condition that it is used solely within the purchasing organisation and is not used for profit or gain.

Printed in the UK

25/04/2014

Introduction

Cskills Awards is recognised as the awarding organisation of CITB by The Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual) for qualifications and units in the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) as well as in the National Qualifications Framework (NQF).

Cskills Awards offers a diverse portfolio of construction qualifications, comprising a broad range of QCF competence (NVQ) and training qualifications, with alternative routes available for both experienced workers and new entrants to the industry. Working with us gives you links to industry together with our technology and creativity to develop innovative construction qualifications that meet your needs. Our range of products and services coupled with our dedicated and personal approach gives our customers great flexibility, choice and support.

This qualification has been accredited to the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) and is eligible for public funding as determined by the Department for Education (DfE) under Section 96 of the Learning and Skills Act 2000.

The qualification title listed above features in the funding lists published annually by the DfE and the regularly updated website www.education.gov.uk/. The QCF Qualification Regulation Number (QRN) should be used by centres when they wish to seek public funding for their learners. Each unit within a qualification will also have a QCF unit code.

The QCF qualification and unit codes will appear on learners’ final certification documentation.

To offer this qualification, you must be registered with Cskills Awards and approved to deliver it. For further information about becoming an approved centre for this qualification, please refer to the Cskills Awards Qualifications and Credit Framework Requirements for Approved Centres which can be found on the website: www.cskills.org/awards/centres.

The Cskills Awards Equality of Opportunity and Diversity and Reasonable Adjustments and Special Considerations policy is available on the website: www.cskills.org/awards/centres.

For Centre’s enquiries, appeals and complaints procedure please refer to the Cskills Awards Qualifications and Credit Framework Requirements for Approved Centres which can be found on the website: www.cskills.org/awards/centres.

For further information, support or guidance please visit www.cskills.org/awards or call 0344 994 4020

Contents

Section 1 - About the qualification

  • Qualification background
  • Qualification purpose
  • Entry requirements
  • Progression
  • Qualification structure and achievement
  • Exemptions
  • Delivery
  • Qualification delivery and assessment
  • Quality assurance
  • Facilities and resources
  • Unit format


Section 2 - Qualification details

  • Rules of Combination (RoC)
  • Units of training


Section 3 - Assessment for the qualification



Appendices

  • Definitions

Section 1: About the Qualification

Qualification background

The units which form this qualification have been derived from National Occupational Standards (NOS). The NOS are a collection of performance statements that detail the underpinning knowledge and understanding required to meet minimum standards which must be achieved within an occupation. The NOS for the construction industry are developed by CITB-ConstructionSkills in partnership with the Construction Industry Council (CIC), the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES) and Qualifications Panel (UKNQP).

For further information about the NOS which have been used to form the units which make up this qualification, please see the ‘Additional Information’ section of the units (see Section 2 of this document).

Cskills Awards’ units and qualifications are developed in collaboration with industry representatives, federations and trainers who ensure our qualifications contain up to date knowledge and skills requirements to promote the employability of the learners who achieve them.

This qualification and the units which form it have been designed to sit within the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) which is regulated by Ofqual. The QCF is a framework designed to support a demand-led approach to skills based on the building up and transfer of credit awarded for learning in a flexible, responsive and inclusive manner.

Qualifications that use the QCF rules are made up of units. This provides flexible ways to get a qualification. Each unit has a credit value which tells you how many credits are awarded when a unit is completed. The credit value of the unit is based on: • one credit for those learning outcomes achievable in 10 hours of learning • learning time – defined as the time taken by learners at the level of the unit, on average, to complete the learning outcomes of the unit to the standard determined by the assessment criteria. The credit value of the unit will remain constant in all contexts, regardless to the assessment method used for the qualification(s) to which it contributes.

Learning time should address all learning (including assessment) relevant to the learning outcomes, regardless of where, when and how the learning has taken place.

Units build up to qualifications. There are three different sizes of qualification in the QCF:

  • Award (1 to 12 credits)
  • Certificate (13 to 36 credits)
  • Diploma (37 credits and above)
The title of a qualification will tell you its size and level.

Any of the units which sit within this qualification may be taken on their own. If a qualification includes a unit that a learner has already been awarded, they can use the unit they have already taken towards that qualification.

Qualification Purpose

The Level 3 Diploma in Bench Joinery has been developed for delivery in a training environment and has been designed to: - further develop the skills and knowledge of people, enabling them to work at an advanced level in the industry in their chosen craft. - prepare learners to take higher-level qualifications to enable them to qualify as team-leaders and managers within the construction industry.

Entry Requirements

Formal entry requirements for learners

There are no formal entry requirements (i.e. qualifications a learner must have achieved) to take this qualification.

Informal entry requirements for learners

Approved Centres are responsible for ensuring that learners are assessed prior to being registered on this qualification. Learners must be deemed to have the potential and opportunity to successfully gain the qualification. A Skill Scan document is available on the website www.cskills.org/awards to aid colleges to assess learners to ensure that they are suitable for enrolment on to this qualification and to assess what level of qualification they should be undertaking.

Where a Learner has prior learning or experience, they may be eligible for exemptions from taking certain units within this qualification; this can be recorded as recognised prior learning. For more information, please refer to the Cskills Awards Qualifications and Credit Framework Requirements for Approved Centres the website: www.cskills.org/awards/centres.

There are no formal entry requirements (i.e. qualifications a learner must have achieved) to take this qualification. This qualification is accredited on the QCF for learners aged 16-18 and 19+. Approved Centres must ensure learners are fully aware of the minimum age requirements of this qualification.

Progression

This Level 3 Diploma in Bench Joinery will enable and/or prepare the learner to progress in their chosen trade and on completion of this qualification, learners may progress: - into employment. - to undertake a Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Wood Occupations - Bench Joinery (for further information about the relationship between NVQ’s and Training Qualifications, please refer to the Toolbox section within the qualification search on the website). - to enrol on an employer led supervisory or management programme, incorporating NVQ’s at a higher level. This qualification also sits within a Construction Apprenticeship Framework and can be taken alongside the Cskills Awards Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Wood Occupations - Bench Joinery and the Cskills Awards Level 1 Award in Employee Rights and Responsibilities in contribution towards achievement of a Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeship in Construction Building. Personal Learning and Thinking Skills (PLTS), a mandatory element of a construction framework apprenticeship, have been mapped to the core units within this qualification. For further information please refer to PLTS guidance document on the website. For further information about the construction Apprenticeship Frameworks, please see website: www.afo.sscalliance.org/

Qualification Structure and Achievement

The qualification comprises:

  • Mandatory units
  • Multiple choice knowledge tests
  • Practical skills assignments

The units of this qualification can be delivered in any order or combined as necessary to form part of a relevant training programme; however, all mandatory units must be completed by each learner. All Learning Outcomes (L/O) and Assessment Criteria (A/C) of the units that learners are registered to take must be achieved prior to claiming the qualification certificate.

For more information about the structure of the qualification, please see the Rules of Combination (RoC) in Section 2 of this document.

Learners who achieve the minimum eligible credit value specified in the rule of combination will achieve the qualification at pass grade.

In Cskills Awards qualifications each unit has a credit value which specifies the number of credits that will be awarded to a learner who has achieved the learning outcomes of the unit. This has been based on:

  • one credit for those learning outcomes achievable in 10 hours of learning time
  • learning time being defined as the time taken by learners at the level of the unit, on average, to complete the learning outcomes of the unit to the standard determined by the assessment criteria.

Qualification exemptions

Some learners may be exempt from taking certain units within this qualification. Please see additional information in each unit in section 2.

Qualification delivery and assessment

Where applicable Cskills Awards have produced a Recognised Prior Learning (RPL)/Accredited Prior Learning (APL) Matrix around units of learning that are progressive in our qualifications, which can be found on the website: www.cskills.org/awards/centres.

An initial assessment of each learner should be carried out before the start of their training programme, which should identify:

  • any of the learners’ previous achievements and prior learning through RPL or any units the learner may have completed and credit they may have accumulated which is relevant to the qualification
  • the appropriate type and level of qualification
  • specific training, support and guidance that the learner may require whilst working towards the qualification

It is recommended that centres carry out an induction programme to ensure that the learner understands what their requirements and responsibilities are and responsibilities of the centre whilst they are working towards their qualification.

Trainers should ensure they are familiar with the structure, content and assessment requirements of the qualification before designing a course programme. Learners should be given maximum opportunity to show their knowledge throughout the training process. To enable learners to do this, trainers may give reasonable help.

Oral questioning can be used throughout the programme to confirm the learners understanding and to obtain further evidence of knowledge. This can be conducted through conversation, direct questioning or interviewing. It is a means of gaining supplementary evidence and will extend and amplify the ability demonstrated in performance. Learners may be questioned:

  • while carrying out an activity, or;
  • immediately upon completion of an activity.
Learners may also be asked questions based on sketches or diagrams, or to produce sketches or diagrams if these will enable them to demonstrate their knowledge more fully. For example, when questioning to check understanding, such as performance in carrying out a pressure test on a system, the learner has been observed going through the correct actions in the correct sequence. The trainer could then ask questions relating to the:

  • different pressure ranges, or;
  • remedial action to be taken if the test fails.

Learners may be asked follow-up questions to ensure they fully understand what is required. Trainers must prepare the questions thoughtfully and accurately and be able to conduct the questioning sensibly and cordially, putting the learner at ease. Any question not understood by the learner must be rephrased, such as ‘Well, let me put it another way…’.

The tone and manner of the questioning is crucial to ensure that learners have a comfortable and encouraging opportunity to perform well.

  • An introduction or preamble to the topic is essential, such as ‘Do you remember when you were asked to ….?’ Or, ‘We are going to talk about safety…’
  • Styles of questions may be factual, such as ‘How did you…?’
  • They may concern reason for an action, such as ‘Why did you…?’
  • They may concern contingencies, such as ‘What is the procedure when…?’

These questions and techniques are to check the learner’s knowledge and ability. Where relevant they are in addition to the end of unit multiple choice knowledge questions which are designed to ensure the learning outcomes have been met using an invigilated environment.

Evidence of learner knowledge and understanding should be retained.

Quality Assurance

For further information about the Quality Assurance requirements, please refer to the Cskills Awards Qualifications and Credit Framework Requirements for Approved Centres and the Cskills Awards Centre Support Guide which can be found on the website: www.cskills.org/awards/centres.

Facilities and resources required to deliver this qualification

Centres will have well equipped workshops with a comprehensive range of hand and portable power tools that meet current industry standards. All powered equipment should be well maintained and PAT certified. Centres will have special designated areas within their workshops (cubicles or project areas) allowing candidates to practice the requirements of the units and carry out the Practical Assignments. For further information on facilities and resources required to deliver this qualification please refer to supporting document.

Unit Format

All units in Cskills Awards training qualifications have a standard format. The unit format is designed to give guidance on the requirements of the qualification for learners, tutors and assessors.

All units can also be obtained from The Register of Regulated Qualifications: http://register.ofqual.gov.uk/

Each unit has the following sections:

Unit code

Each unit is assigned a Cskills Awards unit code which will appear on Cskills Awards On-line registration and achievement system.

Unit title

The unit title is accredited on the QCF and based on the subject area and content of the unit. The unit title will appear on the learner’s certificate of achievement.

QCF level

All units and qualifications within the QCF will have a level assigned to them, which represents the level of achievement. The level of the unit has been informed by the QCF level descriptors and where appropriate, the NOS and/or other sector/professional benchmarks.

Credit value

All units have a credit value. The credit value is the number of credits that will be awarded to the learner for successful achievement of the unit. It is an estimate of the learning time it will take the learners to achieve the unit.

Guided learning hours (GLH)

GLH are defined as all the times when a tutor, trainer or facilitator is present and contributing to the learning process. This definition includes lectures, tutorials and supervised study in; for example, open learning centres and learning workshops. It also includes time spent by staff assessing learners’ achievements. It does not include time spent by staff in day-to-day marking of assignments or homework where the learner is not present.

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of a unit set out what a learner is expected to know, understand or be able to do as the result of a process of learning.

Assessment criteria

The assessment criteria of a unit specify the standard a learner is expected to meet to demonstrate that a learning outcome, or set of learning outcomes, has been achieved. The learning outcomes and assessment criteria clearly articulate the learning achievement for which the credit will be awarded at the level assigned to the unit. Further scope on what areas within the assessment criteria must be covered can be found under Notes for Guidance.

Notes for guidance

The content provides the range of subject material for the programme of learning and specifies the skills, knowledge and understanding required for achievement of the unit.



Additional information about the unit

Purpose and aim of unit

The aim provides a summary of the purpose of the unit and is a concise statement that summarises the learning outcomes of the unit.

Relationship of the unit to relevant NOS

Identifies National Occupational Stardards (NOS), where they exist, used to develop the units that assess the knowledge and skills specified for a particular vocation or occupational area.

Assessment requirements

Identifies the methods of assessment required to achieve the unit.

Unit reference

Each unit is assigned a QCF unit reference that appears with the unit title on the Register of Regulated Qualifications.

Exemption(s) for unit

Identifies any exemption(s) for the requirement to achieve credit for the units that learners can claim.

 

Rules of Combination

The Rule of Combination (RoC) below specifies the combination of units that need to be achieved for the individual to be awarded the qualification.

Qualification Title: Level 3 Diploma in Bench Joinery (Construction) - NEW

Minimum Credit Value: 125

Minimum Guided Learning Hours (GLH) for this qualification: 885

To achieve this qualification a minimum of 125 credits need to be attained. This comprises the 6 mandatory units.

Mandatory Units(credit value: 125)Units required: 6 

Unit CodeTitleCreditsGLHLevelUnit reference number
CSA L1Core01Health, safety and welfare in construction and associated industries5451J/504/7856
CSA L3Core07Analysing technical information, quantities and communication with others 11773F/504/7855
CSA L3Core08Analysing the construction industry and built environment 9633T/504/7867
CSA L3Occ135Set up and operate woodworking machinery to create curved work7493F/504/8021
CSA L3Occ136Manufacture shaped joinery products654553A/504/7952
CSA L3Occ137Set and mark out for shaped joinery products281963K/504/7879

Unit Details

 
Unit CodeCSA L1Core01
TitleHealth, safety and welfare in construction and associated industries
Level1
Credit Value5
Guided Learning Hours45
 
Learning outcomes
The learner will be able to:
Assessment criteria
The learner can:
Notes for guidance
1Know the health and safety regulations, roles and responsibilities.1.1Identify key health and safety legislation relevant to and used in a construction environment.In relation to:
- health and safety at work act (HASAWA).
- reporting injuries, diseases, and dangerous
Occurrences (RIDDOR).
- control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH).
- Control of asbestos at work regulations.
- provision and use of work equipment (PUWER).
- manual handling.
- personal protective equipment (PPE).
- working at height.
1.2State the key employer responsibilities under the Health and Safety at Work Act (HASAWA).In relation to:
- safe working environment.
- adequate staff training.
- health and safety information.
- risk assessment.
- supervision.
1.3State the key employee responsibilities under the Health and Safety at Work Act (HASAWA).In relation to:
- working safely.
- working in partnership with the employer.
- reporting hazards, near misses and accidents correctly.
1.4State the roles and responsibilities of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).Including:
- enforcement.
- legislation and advice.
- inspection.
1.5Identify other sources of relevant health and safety information.Including:
- Health and Safety Executive - CITB–ConstructionSkills.
- British Standards Institute (BSI).
- Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (ROSPA).
- Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH).
1.6State when legislation would require the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) to be informed.
1.7State why there is a requirement for enforcing stringent guidance in health and safety.
1.8State the importance of holding on-site safety inductions and toolbox talks.
1.9State how your behaviour and actions could affect others.
2Know the accident and emergency procedures and how to report them.2.1State the major types of emergencies that could occur in the workplace.Including:
- fires.
- bombs and security alerts.
- flooding.
- collapses.
- gas.
2.2State the key legislation used for reporting accidents.- Reporting Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous occurrences (RIDDOR).
2.3State the different types of injuries, diseases and dangerous occurrences in the workplace.
2.4State the main types of records used in the event of an accident or emergency.Including:
- accident reporting documentation.
- first aid records.
- organisational records and documentation.
2.5State why it is important to report accidents and near misses.
2.6State the difference between major and minor injuries and the meaning of a near miss.
2.7List the key accident trends within the United Kingdom construction industry.In reference to:
- Health and Safety Executive (HSE).
- ROSPA.
2.8State the effects that common types of accidents and injuries could have on the employer.Including:
- poor company image.
- loss of production.
- insurance.
- closure of site.
2.9List the authorised personnel who could be involved in dealing with accident and emergency situations.Including:
- first aiders / emergency responders.
- supervisors/managers.
- health and safety executive.
- emergency services.
2.10List the contents of a basic first aid kit.
2.11State the actions to be taken on discovering an accident.Including:
- area made safe.
- call for help.
- emergency services.
3Know how to identify hazards on construction sites.3.1State the importance of good housekeeping.
3.2State the purpose of risk assessments and method statements.Including:
- forms.
- near miss reports.
- hazard books.
3.3List the major types of hazards in the workplace.Including:
- fires.
- tripping.
- chemical spills.
- falls from height.
- burns.
- electrical.
- exposure to hazardous substances (asbestos or mould infestation).
- plant / vehicles.
3.4State the importance and methods of reporting hazards.Including:
- prevent danger to others.
- prevent accidents / dangerous occurrences.
- hazard/accident books / near miss registers.
- site/company/workplace procedures.
3.5State why hazards can be created by changing circumstances in the workplace.Including:
- construction site developments.
- plant and vehicles.
- new intake of work personnel.
- periods of extreme weather e.g. flood, wind, heat and snow.
3.6State the importance of the correct storage of combustibles and chemicals on site.
4Know about health and hygiene in a construction environment.4.1List the requirements for welfare facilities in a construction environment.Including:
- toilets.
- washing facilities.
4.2State the health effects of noise and the appropriate precautions that can be taken.Including:
- personal protective equipment.
- isolation.
4.3Identify the various substances hazardous to health and the appropriate precautions that need to be taken.Including:
Legislation:
- COSHH.
- asbestos regulations.
- explosives regulations.

Substances:
e.g.
- lead paint.
- solvents, adhesives.
- cements.
- dust.
- contaminated soil or water.
- asbestos containing products/materials.

Precautions:
- personal protective equipment.
- respiratory equipment (RPE).
- isolation.
- exposure times.
4.4State the importance of personal hygiene.
4.5List possible consequences of health risks in the workplace.Including:
- dermatitis, skin cancer.
- infection, eye damage.
- head injury, cuts.
- leptospirosis (Weils disease).
- burns.
- hearing damage.
- respiratory failure.
- lung damage, lung disease.
- asbestosis.
- Hand/Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS) or vibration white finger.
- death.
5Know how to handle and store materials and equipment safely.5.1State the procedures for safe lifting in accordance with guidance and legislation.Including:
- manual handling techniques.
- mechanical lifting equipment/devices.
- team lifting.
5.2State the importance of using site safety equipment when handling and storing materials and equipment.Including:
- Provision of different types of safety equipment to minimise risk.
5.3Identify the key legislation relating to the safe handling of materials and equipment.Including:
- HASAWA.
- manual Handling.
- COSHH.
- asbestos regulations.
5.4State the importance of correct storage of construction materials.In relation to:
- minimising and dealing with spillages.
- maximising shelf life / stock rotation.
- ensuring safety to others when collecting resources from storage areas.
- manufacturers’ guidance / instructions.
- correct environment.
5.5State the importance of waste control procedures in the workplace.Including:
- reuse.
- recycling.
- general waste.
- contractual obligations / environmental considerations.
6Know about basic working platforms and access equipment.6.1State the safe methods of use and appropriate parts of working platforms and access equipment.Including:
- ensuring any work at height is planned, so proper precautions are put in place.
- ensuring equipment to be used for working at heights is inspected and maintained prior to and during use.

Taking in to account:
- ground conditions.
- loading.
- manufacturers’ guidance and instructions.

Types of working platforms and access equipment:
- working platforms.
- step ladders, ladders, extension ladders.
- proprietary scaffolds (e.g. mobile tower scaffolds).
6.2State good practice methods in the use of working platforms and access equipment.In relation to the use of:
- working platforms.
- stepladders, ladders, extension ladders.
- proprietary scaffolding e.g. mobile tower scaffolds.

Including:
- moving.
- loading.
- storing materials on platforms.
6.3Identify the dangers of working at height when using basic working platforms and access equipment. In relation to:
- general public.
- employees.
- head injuries.
- falling from height.
- materials and objects falling from height.
- proximity hazards.
- fragile roofs.
7Know how to work safely around electricity in a construction environment.7.1State the precautions to be taken to avoid risks to themselves and others when working with electricity.In relation to:
- PAT testing.
- RCD devices.
- visually inspecting leads and cables prior to
use.
- use of appropriate access equipment.
- use of portable power tools.
7.2State the dangers and effects of those dangers associated with the use of electricity.Including:
- burns.
- electrocution.
- fire.
7.3State the different voltages that could be used in the workplace.Including:
- 110, 240 and 415 volts.
7.4State why there is a need for cables to be colour coded.Including:
- live, neutral and earth colours.
7.5State the requirements for working safely with equipment of differing electrical voltages.Including:
- 100, 240 and 415 volts.
- use of protection devices e.g. RCD’s with any 240 volt tools.
- Only use other voltages above 110 volts if part of a safe system of work.
7.6State the methods and importance of storing electrical equipment correctly.
8Know how to use personal protective equipment (PPE) correctly.8.1State the importance of and the different types of personal protective equipment (PPE) used in the workplace.Including:
- hard hats.
- eye/ear protection.
- face/dust masks, respiratory equipment (RPE)
- protective clothing.
- hi-vis.
- toe protection, boots, non slip soles.
- gloves, hand protection.
- sun protection, barrier cream.
8.2State the legislation governing personal protective equipment (PPE).Including:
- control of hazardous substances (COSHH).
- provision and use of work equipment.
- head protection and PPE.
8.3State why it is important to store and maintain personal protective equipment (PPE) correctly.
8.4List the possible consequences of not using the correct personal protective equipment (PPE).Including:
- dermatitis, skin cancer.
- infection, eye damage.
- head injury, cuts.
- leptospirosis (weil’s disease) - including the consequences of not adopting appropriate working hygiene practices.
- burns.
- hearing damage.
- respiratory failure.
- lung damage / lung disease.
- asbestosis.
- death.
9Know the fire and emergency procedures.9.1List the three elements essential to creating a fire. In relation to:
- oxygen, fuel, heat.
9.2State the ways in which a fire could spread and identify methods of fire prevention.In relation to:
- fire prevention.
- identify hazards.
- report hazards.
- remove or reduce sources of ignition how fires can spread- fuel eg timber, paper and flammable liquids.
- sources of heat, such as a spark, welding torch blow lamp, or a cigarette that has not been put out.
- hot work areas where smoking is allowed or even cooking in the canteen.

Fire Prevention:
- keeping work areas tidy.
- removal of flammable waste material.
- complying with site/organisational rules for fire safety.
- being aware of things that can cause fires.
- reporting to your supervisor or employer anything that maybe a fire risk.
9.3State the actions to be taken on discovering a fire.Including:
- raising the alarm.
- alerting others.
- clearing exists.
- leaving the building via escape routes/assembling at the correct assembly point.
9.4State the correct fire evacuation procedures.Including:
- clearing exits.
- moving to the assembly area.
9.5State the different types of fire extinguishers and their correct uses.Including:
- water
- organic fires.
- foam
- liquid and organic fires.
- CO
- electrical fires.
- dry powder
- electrical, liquids.
10Know about signs and safety notices.10.1List the categories of signs and safety notices used in the workplace.Including:
- prohibition.
- mandatory.
- warning.
- safe condition.
10.2State the key differences between signs and safety notices used in the workplace.Including:
- specific colour.
- purpose.
- shape (either individual i.e. circular or triangular or shape within a rectangular enclosure).
 
Additional information about this unit
Purpose and aim of unitThe aim of this unit is to provide the learner with the knowledge to be deemed trained to carry out safe working practices in construction to:
- Sourcing relevant safety information and using the relevant safety procedures at work.
Details of the relationship between the unit and relevant national occupational standards or other professional standards or curricula (if appropriate)This unit is based on the National Occupational Standard:
COSVR 641 Conform to General Workplace Health, Safety and Welfare.
Assessment requirements or guidance specified by a sector or regulatory body (if appropriate)This unit will be achieved in accordance with the additional guidance requirements as set out by the Awarding Organisation.
Unit reference numberJ/504/7856
Exemption(s) for this unitNone.
 
 
Unit CodeCSA L3Core07
TitleAnalysing technical information, quantities and communication with others
Level3
Credit Value11
Guided Learning Hours77
 
Learning outcomes
The learner will be able to:
Assessment criteria
The learner can:
Notes for guidance
1Know how to produce different types of drawings and information in the construction industry.1.1Explain the advantages and disadvantages of electronic drawing methods to traditional drawing methods.
1.2Explain the range of details required for floor plans in construction drawings.Including:
- sections, datum levels, wall constructions, material codes, depth dimensions, heights, schedules, specification.
1.3Detail information required for elevation in construction drawings.Including:
- sections, datum levels, wall constructions, material codes, depth dimensions, heights, schedules, specification.
1.4Explain the information required for linking specification schedules to drawings.
1.5Compare the reasons for different projections used in construction drawings.Including:
- Orthographic, Isometric.
- sections, datum levels, wall constructions, material codes, depth dimensions, heights, schedules, specification.
1.6Explain why hatchings and symbols are used in construction drawings.Including:
- sections, datum levels, wall constructions, material codes, depth dimensions, heights, schedules, specification.
2Know how to estimate quantities and price work for contracts2.1Analyse the resource requirements for a construction task.Including:
- quantities.
- resources.
- labour.
2.2Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of purchasing or hiring plant and equipment.
2.3Explain the benefits of planning the sequence of materials and labour requirements.Including:
- use of bills of quantities, programmes of work, stock systems, lead times, schedules, pricing systems, ghant charts, bar charts.
2.4Explain suitable methods used for calculating hours required.Including:
- labour costs.
- duration and type of work to be carried out.
- formulas.
- manual methods.
2.5Explain a range of added costs to consider when estimating work.Including:
- insurance contribution stage payments, value added tax (VAT), PAYE, travel expenses, profit and loss, suppliers terms and conditions, wastage, penalty clauses.
2.6Define the elements that make up the total estimated price.Including:
- VAT, PAYE, plant and equipment hire, penalties and contingencies.
2.7Explain the different factors that affect profitability.
3Know how to ensure good working practices.3.1Explain the measures undertaken on site to maintain good working relationships.Including:
- site agent, clerk of works, contracts manager, manual workers, supervisors, skilled employees, professional technicians.
- hierarchical charts.
3.2Explain the need for maintaining the trust and confidence of colleagues.
3.3Analyse the need for accurate communication throughout the stages of construction.In relation to:
- alternations to drawings.
- variation to contracts.
- changes to risk assessments.
- work restrictions.
- changing circumstances.
 
Additional information about this unit
Purpose and aim of unitThe aim of this unit is to provide the learner with the knowledge to be deemed trained to interpret information, determine quantities and communicate with others in relation to:
- interpreting information including drawings and plans.
- estimating quantities and price work for contracting.
- organise the building process and communicate the design to work colleagues and others ensuring efficient working practices.
Details of the relationship between the unit and relevant national occupational standards or other professional standards or curricula (if appropriate)This unit has no directly comparable NOS but is underpinned by generic criteria within all construction NOS.
Assessment requirements or guidance specified by a sector or regulatory body (if appropriate)This unit will be achieved in accordance with the additional guidance requirements as set out by the Awarding Organisation.
Unit reference numberF/504/7855
Exemption(s) for this unitNone.
 
 
Unit CodeCSA L3Core08
TitleAnalysing the construction industry and built environment
Level3
Credit Value9
Guided Learning Hours63
 
Learning outcomes
The learner will be able to:
Assessment criteria
The learner can:
Notes for guidance
1Understand the different activities undertaken with the construction industry and built environment.1.1Describe the range of activities undertaken by the construction industry and built environment.Could include:
- Building, finishing, architecture, town planning, surveying, civil engineering, repair and maintenance, building engineering services, facilities management, construction site management, plant maintenance and operation, demolition.
1.2Describe the types of work undertaken within the construction industry.Could include:
- Residential, commercial, industrial, retail, recreational, leisure, health, transport infrastructure, public buildings, heritage, conservation, educational, utilities and services.
1.3Describe the different types of clients within the construction industry.Could include:
- private; individuals, sole traders.
- corporate; large companies/corporations, public and private corporations or initiatives.
- government led; national, regional, local.
2Understand the different roles and responsibilities undertaken within the construction industry and built environment.2.1Explain the different roles and responsibilities of the construction workforce.Could include:
- client, architect, designer, estimators, planners, buyers.
- land agents, land surveyors, building surveyors, quantity surveyors.
- consulting engineers, plant engineers, site engineers, specialist engineers, mechanical engineers.
- site manager, clerk of works, contracts manager, health and safety manager.
- craft persons, general operatives.
- construction specialists including demolition engineers and operatives, transportation and infrastructure engineers.
3Understand the physical and environmental factors when undertaking a construction project.3.1Explain the difference between physical and environmental factors.Could include:
- planning and development stages of the construction process, the impact on the human/man-made environment.
- regarding the impact of a development or redevelopment on the natural environment.
3.2Explain the environmental factors that have to be considered as part of the construction planning process.Could include:
- Planning requirements.
- building regulations.
- development or land restrictions.
- building design and footprint.
- use of building / structure.
- impact on local amenities.
- impact on existing services/utilities.
- impact on transportation infrastructure.
- topography of the proposed development site.
- green field site or brown field site.
3.3Explain the physical factors that have to be considered as part of the construction planning process.Could include:
- topography of the development site.
- existing trees and vegetation.
- impact on existing wildlife / habitats.
- size of land and building footprint.
- access to the building/structure, approach roads and footpaths.
- supply of services to the building/structure (mains water, drainage, electricity, gas, telecoms etc).
- natural waterways, lakes, ponds, ditches.
- land restrictions, surrounding properties, protective orders on land, scheduled buildings or monuments.
- future development and expansion.
4Understand how construction projects can benefit the built environment. 4.1Describe the different land types available for development.Including:
- green field land/ sites.
- brown field land/sites.
– reclaimed land/contaminated land.
4.2Explain the advantages and disadvantage of development on different land types.including:
- green field sites.
- brown field sites.

Could include:
- planning restrictions.
- land use.
- building restrictions.
- cost.
- contaminated land.
- reusing land.
- space issues.
4.3Describe the social benefits of construction development.Including:
- regeneration of waste land.
- local employment.
- improved housing.
- improvements to local infrastructure.
- improvements to local amenities.
5Understand the principles of sustainability within the construction industry and built environment. 5.1Explain what is meant by the term sustainability.Could include:
- finite resources.
- global shortages, needs of future generations.
- environmental factors, global warming, climate change, extinction of species and vegetation, destruction of natural resources.
- social regeneration.
5.2Explain how sustainability can be applied to construction and civil engineering projects.Could include:
- green construction methods.
- use of green or locally sourced materials.
- increase use of reclaimed and recycled materials.
- zero carbon initiatives.
- energy saving technology.
- alternative energy sources.
- waste water recycling and water saving initiatives.
- improved waste management.
5.3Explain the benefits of using sustainable materials and construction methods.Could include:
- locally sourced materials.
- guaranteed availability of materials.
- enhanced material properties (energy saving).
- lower carbon footprint.
- protecting the natural environment.
- controlled waste management.
 
Additional information about this unit
Purpose and aim of unitThe aim of this unit is to provide the learner with the knowledge of building methods and construction technology in relation to:
- Understanding activities undertaken in the construction industry and wider built environment.
- Understanding different roles and responsibilities within a construction project.
- Understanding physical and environmental factors when undertaking a construction project.
- Understanding how construction can be beneficial to the built environment.
- Understanding principles of sustainability on a construction project.
Details of the relationship between the unit and relevant national occupational standards or other professional standards or curricula (if appropriate)This unit has no directly comparable NOS but is underpinned by generic criteria within all construction NOS.
Assessment requirements or guidance specified by a sector or regulatory body (if appropriate)This unit will be achieved in accordance with the additional guidance requirements as set out by the Awarding Organisation.
Unit reference numberT/504/7867
Exemption(s) for this unitNone.
 
 
Unit CodeCSA L3Occ135
TitleSet up and operate woodworking machinery to create curved work
Level3
Credit Value7
Guided Learning Hours49
 
Learning outcomes
The learner will be able to:
Assessment criteria
The learner can:
Notes for guidance
1Know how to inspect and maintain woodworking machinery.1.1State the potential hazards associated with setting up and operating woodworking machinery.Including:
- which Health and Safety preventative measures can be adopted.
1.2Explain how to extract information from regulations applicable to a range of woodworking machinery.Including:
- Construction Health and Safety.
- Manufacturers’ instructions.
- Approved Code of Practice (ACoP).
- Health and Safety at Work Act (HASAWA).
- Provision and Use of Powered Equipment Regulations (PUWER).
- Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH).
1.3Interpret manufacturers’ information and machine maintenance standards for a specific range of woodworking machinery.Including:
- Start-up and shut down procedures.
- Parts and methods of operation.
- Servicing intervals.
- Commonly reported faults.
- Good practice maintenance procedures.

Machinery including:
- circular saws, planers, thicknessers, bandsaws, mortiser, tenoner, spindle moulder, drill, grinder, sander.
1.4Describe safe procedures for the inspection and maintenance of a specific range of woodworking machinery.Including:
- plans, scale drawings, job sheets, specifications, schedules, cutting lists, component range drawings, manufacturers’ catalogues, building regulations.
1.5Explain the personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements for working with fixed machinery.Including:
- collective protective measures.
- personal protective equipment (PPE).
- respiratory protective equipment (RPE).
1.6Describe how to protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with organisational procedures.Including:
- against damage from general workplace activities, other occupations, environmental conditions.
2Be able to inspect and maintain specific woodworking machinery.2.1Protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with organisational procedures.Including:
- minimising damage.
- maintaining a clean work space.
- disposing of waste.
2.2Select and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) for working with specific woodworking machinery.Including:
- collective protective measures.
- personal protective equipment (PPE).
- respiratory protective equipment (RPE).
2.3Inspect the applicable machinery and tooling to identify potential faults, following isolation and in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions and current legislation.Machinery including at least six of:
- circular saws, planers, thicknessers, bandsaws, mortiser, tenoner, spindle moulder, drill, grinder, sander.

Potential faults including:
- damage, DIY repair, missing riving knife, poorly fitted or missing guards, poor wiring, lack of maintenance, inadequate or blocked extraction, unsafe work area, tooling.
2.4Correct faults within the limits of given authority.Potential faults including:
- damage, DIY repair, missing riving knife, poorly fitted or missing guards, poor wiring, lack of maintenance, inadequate or blocked extraction, unsafe work area, tooling.
2.5Report faults outside given authority to the appropriate person in accordance with organisational procedures.Potential faults including:
- damage, DIY repair, missing riving knife, poorly fitted or missing guards, poor wiring, lack of maintenance, inadequate or blocked extraction, unsafe work area, tooling.
2.6Maintain specific woodworking machinery in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions.Maintenance including:
- knives and blades kept sharp or replaced, lubrication, correct tensions.

Good practice procedures including:
- organisational procedures, current legislation, manufacturers’ operating instructions.
3Know how to set up and use woodworking machinery safely.3.1Explain the importance of using manufacturers’ operating instructions when using woodworking machinery.
3.2List potential hazards inherent in the machinery being used.Including:
- missing riving knife, poorly fitted or missing guards, poor wiring, inadequate or blocked extraction, unsafe work area, tooling.
3.3Explain the importance of teamwork when working with woodworking machinery.Including:
- circular saws, planers, thicknessers, bandsaws, mortisers.
3.4Describe the characteristics of different types of materials and resources used with woodworking machinery.Including:
- types, quantity, quality, sizes and sustainability of standard tools and ancillary equipment.

Material defects including:
- bowing, cupping, twisting, warping.
3.5Explain how to identify safe tooling for woodworking machinery.Including:
- bandsaw and circular saw blades, knives, bits, blades, mortise chisels.
3.6Describe different methods of changing tooling.Including:
- bandsaw and circular saw blades, knives, bits, blades, mortise chisels.
4Be able to set up and operate specific woodworking machinery safely.4.1Set up the applicable machinery for the work using relevant information sources.Machinery including at least 1 from each of the following groups:
- radial arm saw, bandsaw.
- sanders, planers, thicknessers.
- mortisers, tennoners, spindle moudler.

Information sources including:
- drawings, rods and cutting lists.
4.2Change machine tooling as required to meet the given specification.Including at least 6 of the following:
- bandsaw and circular saw blades, knives, bits, blades, mortiser chisels, drills, taps, accessories and ancillary equipment.
4.3Operate the applicable machinery safely using the following safety aids and guards:
- Push stick.
- Push block.
- Supports.
- Autofeed table.
Machinery including at least 1 from each of the following groups:
- radial arm saw, bandsaw.
- sanders, planers, thicknessers.
- mortisers, tennoners, spindle moudler.
4.4Work with team members to lift and cut large or heavy materials in accordance with organisational procedures and the given specification, as appropriate.
4.5Produce the work in accordance with the given specification.Including:
- cutting materials to size and shape, planning timber, mortising timber, cutting sections straight and shaped.
 
Additional information about this unit
Purpose and aim of unitThe aim of this unit is to provide the learner with the knowledge and skills to be deemed trained to set up and operate specific woodworking machinery in relation to:
- carry out pre start checks to ensure safety and efficiency
- perform basic maintenance on fixed machinery.
- set up and operate fixed machinery
Details of the relationship between the unit and relevant national occupational standards or other professional standards or curricula (if appropriate)This unit is based on the National Occupational Standard:

COSVR633 Set Up and Use Fixed Machinery.
Assessment requirements or guidance specified by a sector or regulatory body (if appropriate)This unit will be achieved in accordance with the additional guidance requirements as set out by the Awarding Organisation.
Unit reference numberF/504/8021
Exemption(s) for this unitNone
 
 
Unit CodeCSA L3Occ136
TitleManufacture shaped joinery products
Level3
Credit Value65
Guided Learning Hours455
 
Learning outcomes
The learner will be able to:
Assessment criteria
The learner can:
Notes for guidance
1Know how to interpret information related to the manufacture of shaped joinery products. 1.1State the potential hazards associated with manufacturing shaped products. Including:
- which Health and Safety preventative measures can be adopted.
1.2Evaluate the different information sources used when manufacturing shaped joinery products.Including:
- plans, job sheets, drawings, given specifications, schedules, method statements, risk assessments, cutting lists, manufacturers' information and catalogues, building regulations.
1.3Explain the purpose of information sources when manufacturing shaped joinery products.
1.4Explain how to check the information for accuracy and compliance with relevant current legislation and the given specification.Including:
- plans, job sheets, drawings, given specifications, schedules, method statements, risk assessments, cutting lists, manufacturers' information and catalogues, building regulations.

Check accuracy including:
- Drawings match each other, match requirements, drawing measurements match existing work and customer requirements.
1.5Explain the procedures for reporting inaccuracies with information.
2Be able to interpret information related to the manufacture of shaped joinery products.2.1Use a range of sources to interpret and extract relevant information relating to manufacturing shaped joinery products.Including:
- plans, job sheets, drawings, given specifications, schedules, method statements, risk assessments, cutting lists, manufacturers' information and catalogues, building regulations.
2.2Check for conformity of the information with relevant current legislation and the given specification.
2.3Record any discrepancies in the information and report them to the appropriate person before commencing the task.
3Know how to prepare for the manufacture of shaped joinery products.3.1Explain the personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements for manufacturing shaped joinery products.Including:
- collective protective measures.
- personal protective equipment (PPE).
- respiratory protective equipment (RPE).
- local exhaust ventilation (LEV).
3.2Explain how to protect the work and its surrounding area from damage.Including: against damage from general workplace activities, other occupations and environmental conditions.
3.3Analyse and evaluate the different characteristics of materials and components required for manufacturing shaped joinery products in accordance with the given specification. Including:
- timber, manufactured sheet material, pre-machined components, setting out rods, non-ferrous metals, glass, plastics, veneers, ironmongery, adhesives, sealants, fixings and associated ancillary items.

Characteristics including:
- Durability, weight, workability, ability to receive preservatives and finishes, quality of finish, environmentally friendly.

Including:
- Timber hardwoods (elm, beech, ash, oak, mahogany, maple) and softwoods (spruce, European redwood, Douglas fir).

Including Timber-based manufactured boards:
- chipboard, blockboard, lamin board, plywood (birch, marine, water boil proof(WBP), sheathing shuttering (medium density fibreboard (MDF), hardboard, oriented strand board (OSB).
3.4Explain the range of defects that could be found with timber-based manufactured boards caused naturally and by conversion and seasoning.Defects including:
- knots, shakes, splits, cupping, bowing, rot, pith, blue stain, sap ducts, twist, worm infestation, case hardening, voids, delamination.
3.5Analyse and evaluate the different characteristics of timber and timber-based boards.
3.6Explain why it is important to comply with the given specification and efficient work methods during the task.
4Be able to prepare for the manufacture of shaped joinery products.4.1Select and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when manufacturing shaped joinery products.Including:
- collective protective measures.
- personal protective equipment (PPE).
- respiratory protective equipment (RPE).
- local exhaust ventilation (LEV).
4.2Protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with the given specification.Including: maintaining a clean work space, disposal of waste, environmental conditions.
4.3Select the materials and components required to manufacture shaped joinery products in accordance with the given specification.Including:
- timber, manufactured sheet material, pre-machined components, setting out rods, non-ferrous metals, glass, plastics, veneers, ironmongery, adhesives, sealants, fixings and associated ancillary items.
4.4Select the timber and timber based boards required to manufacture shaped joinery products in accordance with the given specification.Materials including:
Hardwoods or softwoods and timber manufactured boards.
4.5Select a range of hand and power tools, machinery and equipment required to manufacture shaped joinery products.
4.6Check materials for defects and take the appropriate actions where required.Defects including:
- knots, shakes, splits, cupping, bowing, rot, pith, blue stain, sap ducts, twist, worm infestation, case hardening, voids and delaminating.
5Know how to manufacture shaped joinery products.5.1Explain the techniques required to produce a range of components in accordance with the given specification.Components including:
- jambs, cills, transoms, mullions, stiles, rails, bars, straight and curved components, plastic components, non-ferrous metal.

Techniques including:
- Wood joints, lengthening joints, scribes, dowelling, mortise and tenon (through, haunched, barefaced, blind, stub, drawbored, and wide rail), dovetails (through and lapped), housing joints.
5.2Explain how to fit, assemble and finish shaped joinery products in accordance with the given specification.Including:
- door sets, doors, sliding sash windows, units and fitments and panelling/cladding.
– staircases, handrails and balustrades straight and with turns.
– veneers – hand and machine.
– products with single and double curvature features.
– products that incorporate associated materials (glass, plastics, fabrics, etc.).
5.3Explain how to maintain hand and power tools and machinery for manufacturing shaped joinery products as the work progresses.
5.4Explain the importance of disposing of waste materials.
6Be able to manufacture shaped joinery products.6.1Apply suitable techniques to produce a range of components in accordance with the given specification.Components could include:
- jambs, cills, transoms, mullions, stiles, rails, bars straight and curved components, plastic components, non-ferrous metal.

Techniques could include:
- Wood joints, lengthening joints, scribes, dowelling mortise and tenon (through, haunched, barefaced, blind, stub, drawbored, wide rail), dovetails (through and lapped), housing joints.

Curvature techniques including one or more of the following:
- laminating, solid and built up, making and using templates and formers as required.
6.2Fit, assemble and finish shaped joinery products in accordance with the given specification.Including:
- door sets, doors, windows, units and fitments and panelling/cladding.
– staircases, handrails and balustrades straight and with turns.
– products with single curve.

Could include:
– veneers – hand and machine.
– products with double curvature features.
– products that incorporate associated materials (glass, plastics, fabrics, etc.).
6.3Take measurements for materials that will fit a finished product.Including:
- glass, plastic, veneers, fabric, non-ferrous metals, ironmongery, fixings.
6.4Maintain hand and power tools as the work progresses in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions.Including:
- tools kept sharp, set correctly and in good condition.
6.5Dispose of waste and clear down workshop in accordance with the given specification. - Protect finished work.
 
Additional information about this unit
Purpose and aim of unitThe aim of this unit is to provide the learner with the knowledge and skills to be deemed trained to manufacture shaped joinery products in relation to:
- selecting resources to carry out the work
- manufacturing shaped joinery products.
Details of the relationship between the unit and relevant national occupational standards or other professional standards or curricula (if appropriate)This unit is based on the National Occupational Standard:

COSVR 632 Manufacture Bespoke Products.
Assessment requirements or guidance specified by a sector or regulatory body (if appropriate)This unit will be achieved in accordance with the additional guidance requirements as set out by the Awarding Organisation.
Unit reference numberA/504/7952
Exemption(s) for this unitNone
 
 
Unit CodeCSA L3Occ137
TitleSet and mark out for shaped joinery products
Level3
Credit Value28
Guided Learning Hours196
 
Learning outcomes
The learner will be able to:
Assessment criteria
The learner can:
Notes for guidance
1Know how to interpret information for producing shaped joinery product details.1.1State the potential hazards associated with manufacturing shaped products. Including:
- which Health and Safety preventative measures can be adopted.
1.2Evaluate the different information sources used for producing shaped joinery product details.Including:
- plans, job sheets, drawings, given specifications, schedules, method statements, risk assessments, cutting lists, manufacturers' information and catalogues, building regulations.
1.3Explain the purpose of information sources when producing shaped joinery product details.
1.4Explain how to check information for accuracy and compliance with relevant current legislation and the given specification.Including:
- plans, job sheets, drawings, given specifications, schedules, method statements, risk assessments, cutting lists, manufacturers' information and catalogues, building regulations.

Check accuracy including:
- Drawings match each other, match requirements, drawing measurements match existing work and customer requirements.
1.5Explain how to calculate dimensions using scales.
1.6Explain the procedures for reporting inaccuracies with information.
2Be able to interpret information for producing shaped joinery product details.2.1Use a range of sources to interpret and extract relevant information relating to producing shaped joinery products.Including:
- plans, job sheets, drawings, given specifications, schedules, method statements, risk assessments, cutting lists, manufacturers' information and catalogues, building regulations.
2.2Assess information for accuracy and conformity and confirm its relevance to the given specification.Including:
- plans, job sheets, drawings, given specifications, schedules, method statements, risk assessments, cutting lists, manufacturers' information and catalogues, building regulations, setting out rods, templates, jigs.

Check accuracy including:
- drawings match each other, match requirements, drawing measurements match existing work and customer requirements.
2.3Calculate appropriate quantities of materials and resources required for producing shaped joinery products. Resources could include:
- glass, plastic, fabric, non-ferrous metals, ironmongery, adhesives, associated ancillary items, fixings, finishes, paper rods.

Materials could include:
- hardwoods or softwoods and timber manufactured boards.
2.4Record any discrepancies in information and report them to the appropriate person before commencing the task.Including:
- plans, job sheets, drawings, given specifications, schedules, method statements, risk assessments, cutting lists, manufacturers' information and catalogues, building regulations.
3Know how to prepare for producing shaped joinery product details.3.1Explain the personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements for producing shaped joinery product details for the environment. Including:
- collective protective measures.
- personal protective equipment (PPE).
- respiratory protective equipment (RPE).
- local exhaust ventilation (LEV).
3.2Explain how to protect the work and its surrounding area from damage.Including:
- against damage from general workplace activities, other occupations and environmental conditions.
3.3Describe the materials and resources required for producing rods and cutting lists for producing shaped joinery products.Resources including:
- glass, plastic, fabric, non-ferrous metals, ironmongery, adhesives, associated ancillary items, fixings, finishes, paper rods, electronic drawing methods.

Materials including:
- hardwoods or softwoods and timber manufactured boards.
3.4Evaluate the different properties of timber and timber-based boards.Including:
- durability, weight, workability (bending, moulding), ability to take preservatives, adhesives, finishes, quality of finishes, environmentally friendly.

Timbers including:
- hardwoods or softwoods and timber manufactured boards.
3.5Define the standard available sizes of timber and timber-based products.Including:
- standard sheet material, sawn material, finished sizes.
3.6Explain the range of defects that could be found with timber-based manufactured boards caused naturally and by conversion and seasoning.Defects including:
- knots, shakes, splits, cupping, bowing, rot, pith, blue stain, sap ducts, twist, worm infestation, case hardening, voids, delamination.

Materials including:
- hardwoods or softwoods and timber manufactured boards.
3.7Explain the importance of maintaining marking and testing tools and equipment as the work progresses.Including:
- bevel, square, rule, scale rule, measuring tape, pencil, marking knife, dividers, box square, trammel heads, beam.
4Be able to prepare for producing shaped joinery product details.4.1Select and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when producing shaped joinery product details.
4.2Protect the work and its surrounding area from damage in accordance with the given specification.Including:
- maintaining a clean work space.
4.3Select the materials and resources required for producing shaped joinery product details.Resources including:
- glass, plastic, fabric, non-ferrous metals, ironmongery, adhesives, associated ancillary items, fixings, finishes, paper rods.

Materials could including:
- hardwoods or softwoods and timber manufactured boards.
4.4Assess suitable resources and materials in accordance with the given specification.Resources including:
- glass, plastic, fabric, non-ferrous metals, ironmongery, adhesives, associated ancillary items, fixings, finishes, paper rods.

Materials could including:
- hardwoods or softwoods and timber manufactured boards.
4.5Select a range of marking and setting tools required to set out and mark out shaped joinery product details.Including:
- bevel, square, rule, scale rule, measuring tape, pencil, marking knife, dividers, box square, trammel heads, beam.
4.6Produce cutting and requisition lists for the materials required in accordance with the given specification.Materials including:
- hardwoods or softwoods and timber manufactured boards.
4.7Record and report defects found with timber and timber-based boards.Defects including:
- knots, shakes, splits, cupping, bowing, rot, pith, blue stain, sap ducts, twist, worm infestation, case hardening.

Materials including:
- hardwoods or softwoods and timber manufactured boards.
5Know how to produce shaped joinery product details.5.1Explain how to take site dimensions in accordance with the given specification.
5.2Explain the procedure for organising the setting out work in the correct sequence in accordance with good practice and the given specification.
5.3Explain the proportions and uses of a range of different woodworking joints.Including:
- halving, edge, housing, lengthening, scribes, dowelling, mortice and tenon (through, haunched, barefaced, blind, stub, drawbored, wide rail), dovetails (through and lapped), housing joints, comb.
5.4Explain the geometric and practical methods of producing curves for joinery products.Including:
- segmental, semicircular, gothic (equilateral, drop), tudor and lancet arches, ellipses, strings and handrails.
5.5Explain the organisational procedures for working safely.
5.6Explain the importance of requisitioning materials.
6Be able to set out and mark out for shaped joinery product details. 6.1Measure dimensions on existing work and compare with the given specifications, adjusting if required.
6.2Set out shaped products in accordance with the work specification.Could include:
- doors, frames, linings, units and fitments, spandrel panelling, turning staircases, joinery products with single and double curvature details, balustrading, handrails.
6.3Measure and mark out shaped products to the given specification using a range of marking out tools.Including:
- bevel, square, rule, scale rule, measuring tape, pencil, marking knife, dividers, box square, trammel heads, beam.
6.4Maintain and store marking and setting out tools and equipment as the work progresses. Including:
- bevel, square, rule, scale rule, measuring tape, pencil, marking knife, dividers, box square, trammel heads, beam.
6.5Dispose of waste and clear down workshop in accordance with the given specification. - Protect finished work.
 
Additional information about this unit
Purpose and aim of unitThe aim of this unit is to provide the learner with the knowledge and skills to be deemed trained to produce shaped joinery product details in relation to:
- interpreting and checking information
- producing setting out details prior to the manufacture of shaped joinery products.
Details of the relationship between the unit and relevant national occupational standards or other professional standards or curricula (if appropriate)This unit is based on the National Occupational Standard:

COSVR 634 Produce Setting Out Details for Bespoke Products.
Assessment requirements or guidance specified by a sector or regulatory body (if appropriate)This unit will be achieved in accordance with the additional guidance requirements as set out by the Awarding Organisation.
Unit reference numberK/504/7879
Exemption(s) for this unitNone
 

Section 3: Assessment for the qualification

Qualification Assessment

The assessment requirements set for this qualification are multiple choice knowledge tests and practical assignments.

Multiple choice knowledge tests

The knowledge assessment is designed to be taken on a computer using the Cskills Awards online testing platform. However paper testing is also available. The tests are externally set and marked multiple choice tests where learners can choose one of four possible answers. The tests cover the learning outcomes for each unit and measures that they have been met. Testing can be by single unit, several units at a time or at the end of the whole qualification. For further information on the Cskills Awards test platform and Cskills Awards Invigilation Policy for Training Qualifications, please refer to the Products and Support section on the website.

Practical assigments

Practical assignments have been developed for each individual unit, which gives you the flexibility to assess learners in the manner which best suits you. This gives you the option to sign learners off on a unit-by-unit basis to aid with retention and recognise every learner’s achievements. These practical assignments have been designed so that certain units are able to be delivered together, however others should be delivered in isolation. Ultimately your learners’ will cover all of the skills learning outcomes and assessment criteria for all of the units. They are designed to be taken within a simulated construction environment, away from the stresses and distractions experienced on a real site. They are practical assignments that are to be taken within a set period of time. The assignments can be delivered by single unit, several units at a time or at the end of the whole qualification. The assignments are to be monitored and marked by the trainers. For further information on the delivery of the practical assignments for this qualification please refer to supporting document. The practical assignments are supplied with high quality BS standard drawings. Where applicable large A1-size prints will be available to display and use in your workshop. To obtain the practical assignments supporting this qualification your centre will need to be approved to deliver this qualification to access through a secure area on Awards Online.

Appendices

Definitions

A/CAssessment Criteria. Each Learning Outcome has a minimum of one Assessment Criteria. These specify the criteria which must be satisfied before the Learner can be deemed to have performed to the required standard.
AwardA qualification consisting of 1 – 12 credits.
CertificateA qualification consisting of 13 – 36 credits.
CICConstruction Industry Council. For more information about the CIC, please see the CIC website: www.cic.org.uk/
CITBConstruction Industry Training Board. For more information about the CITB, please see the CITB website: www.citb.co.uk/
DfEDepartment of Education. For more information about the DfE, please see the DfE website: www.education.gov.uk/
DiplomaA qualification consisting of 37+ credits.
GLHGuided Learning Hours
LearnerAn individual undertaking the qualification
L/OLearning Outcomes. Units are divided into Learning Outcomes which describe in detail the skills and knowledge that a learner must possess.
NOSNational Occupational Standards. For more information about NOS, please see the NOS website: www.ukstandards.co.uk
NQFNational Qualifications Framework
NVQNational Vocational Qualification
OFQUALOffice of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation. For more information about Ofqual, please see the Ofqual website: http://www.ofqual.gov.uk/
QCFQualifications and Credit Framework
QRNQualification Regulation Number
RoCRule of Combination
UKNQPQualifications Panel (UKNQP)
UKCESUK Commission for Employment and Skills. For more information about the UKCES, please see the UKCES website: http://www.ukces.org.uk/

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